• Media type: E-Article
  • Title: Mass Spectrometry–Based Analysis of Urinary Biomarkers for Dietary Tomato Intake
  • Contributor: Hövelmann, Yannick; Lewin, Lea; Steinert, Katharina; Hübner, Florian; Humpf, Hans‐Ulrich
  • Published: Wiley, 2020
  • Published in: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
  • Extent:
  • Language: English
  • DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.202000011
  • ISSN: 1613-4125; 1613-4133
  • Keywords: Food Science ; Biotechnology
  • Abstract: <jats:sec><jats:title>Scope</jats:title><jats:p>In this study, the applicability of several β‐carboline, imidazole, and steroidal alkaloids as biomarkers for tomato juice intake is evaluated.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods and results</jats:title><jats:p>Over the course of a 2‐week crossover dietary intervention study, 14 volunteers were given low and high doses of tomato juice after 3 days of avoiding tomato‐based products. On the day of consumption and the following days, volunteers provided urine samples that were quantitatively analyzed by high‐performance liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spectrometry. Herein, glucose‐derived β‐carboline alkaloids are determined as supporting, yet non‐specific dietary biomarkers for tomato juice intake. Several imidazole alkaloids represent further biomarkers, which are shown to specifically indicate consumption of tomato juice for 24 h and partly &gt;24 h. Additionally, steroidal alkaloids derived from esculeogenin B are determined to be specific biomarkers for tomato juice detectable for at least 48 h after consumption. The intake of low and high amounts of tomato juice is significantly distinguishable based on the urinary excretion of all determined biomarkers as well.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>The dietary intake of tomato juice is conclusively traceable based on urinary excretion of multiple β‐carboline, imidazole, and steroidal alkaloids, and can be determined for up to 48 h after consumption. Furthermore, different intake doses can clearly be distinguished based on their urinary excretion.</jats:p></jats:sec>
  • Description: <jats:sec><jats:title>Scope</jats:title><jats:p>In this study, the applicability of several β‐carboline, imidazole, and steroidal alkaloids as biomarkers for tomato juice intake is evaluated.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods and results</jats:title><jats:p>Over the course of a 2‐week crossover dietary intervention study, 14 volunteers were given low and high doses of tomato juice after 3 days of avoiding tomato‐based products. On the day of consumption and the following days, volunteers provided urine samples that were quantitatively analyzed by high‐performance liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spectrometry. Herein, glucose‐derived β‐carboline alkaloids are determined as supporting, yet non‐specific dietary biomarkers for tomato juice intake. Several imidazole alkaloids represent further biomarkers, which are shown to specifically indicate consumption of tomato juice for 24 h and partly &gt;24 h. Additionally, steroidal alkaloids derived from esculeogenin B are determined to be specific biomarkers for tomato juice detectable for at least 48 h after consumption. The intake of low and high amounts of tomato juice is significantly distinguishable based on the urinary excretion of all determined biomarkers as well.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>The dietary intake of tomato juice is conclusively traceable based on urinary excretion of multiple β‐carboline, imidazole, and steroidal alkaloids, and can be determined for up to 48 h after consumption. Furthermore, different intake doses can clearly be distinguished based on their urinary excretion.</jats:p></jats:sec>
  • Footnote: