• Media type: E-Article
  • Title: Metabolite profiling and isolation of biologically active compounds from Scadoxus puniceus, a highly traded South African medicinal plant
  • Contributor: Naidoo, Devashan; Slavětínská, Lenka Poštová; Aremu, Adeyemi O.; Gruz, Jiri; Biba, Ondrej; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, Johannes; Finnie, Jeffrey F.
  • imprint: Wiley, 2018
  • Published in: Phytotherapy Research
  • Language: English
  • DOI: 10.1002/ptr.6000
  • ISSN: 1099-1573; 0951-418X
  • Keywords: Pharmacology
  • Origination:
  • Footnote:
  • Description: <jats:p><jats:italic>Scadoxus puniceus</jats:italic> (Amaryllidaceae), a medicinal plant of high value in South Africa, is used as a component of a traditional herbal tonic prescribed to treat several ailments. Ultra‐high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry quantified the phenolic compounds in different organs of <jats:italic>S</jats:italic>. <jats:italic>puniceus</jats:italic>. Gravity column chromatography was used to separate fractions and active compounds. The structure of these compounds was determined using 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic techniques. A microplate technique was used to determine the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the pure compounds. Metabolite profiling revealed a greater profusion of hydroxycinnamic acids (69.5%), as opposed to hydroxybenzoic acids (30.5%). Chlorogenic acid was the most abundant (49.6% of hydroxycinnamic acids) compound. In addition to chlorogenic acid, the study is the first to report the presence of sinapic, gallic, and <jats:italic>m</jats:italic>‐hydroxybenzoic acids in the Amaryllidaceae. Chromatographic separation of <jats:italic>S</jats:italic>. <jats:italic>puniceus</jats:italic> led to the isolation of haemanthamine (<jats:bold>1</jats:bold>), haemanthidine (<jats:bold>2</jats:bold>), and a rare chlorinated amide, metolachlor (<jats:bold>3</jats:bold>), the natural occurrence of which is described for the first time. Haemanthamine, haemanthidine, and metolachlor displayed strong acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (IC<jats:sub>50</jats:sub>; 23.1, 23.7, and 11.5 μM, respectively). These results substantiate the frequent use of <jats:italic>S</jats:italic>. <jats:italic>puniceus</jats:italic> as a medicinal plant and hold much promise for further pharmaceutical development.</jats:p>