• Media type: E-Article
  • Title: Arrhythmias as Presentation of Genetic Cardiomyopathy
  • Contributor: Lukas Laws, J.; Lancaster, Megan C.; Ben Shoemaker, M.; Stevenson, William G.; Hung, Rebecca R.; Wells, Quinn; Marshall Brinkley, D.; Hughes, Sean; Anderson, Katherine; Roden, Dan; Stevenson, Lynne W.
  • Published in: Circulation Research
  • Published: Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2022
  • Language: English
  • DOI: 10.1161/circresaha.122.319835
  • ISSN: 1524-4571; 0009-7330
  • Keywords: Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine ; Physiology
  • Abstract: <jats:p>There is increasing evidence regarding the prevalence of genetic cardiomyopathies, for which arrhythmias may be the first presentation. Ventricular and atrial arrhythmias presenting in the absence of known myocardial disease are often labelled as idiopathic, or lone. While ventricular arrhythmias are well-recognized as presentation for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in the right ventricle, the scope of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy has broadened to include those with dominant left ventricular involvement, usually with a phenotype of dilated cardiomyopathy. In addition, careful evaluation for genetic cardiomyopathy is also warranted for patients presenting with frequent premature ventricular contractions, conduction system disease, and early onset atrial fibrillation, in which most detected genes are in the cardiomyopathy panels. Sudden death can occur early in the course of these genetic cardiomyopathies, for which risk is not adequately tracked by left ventricular ejection fraction. Only a few of the cardiomyopathy genotypes implicated in early sudden death are recognized in current indications for implantable cardioverter defibrillators which otherwise rely upon a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤0.35 in dilated cardiomyopathy. The genetic diagnoses impact other aspects of clinical management such as exercise prescription and pharmacological therapy of arrhythmias, and new therapies are coming into clinical investigation for specific genetic cardiomyopathies. The expansion of available genetic information and implications raises new challenges for genetic counseling, particularly with the family member who has no evidence of a cardiomyopathy phenotype and may face a potentially negative impact of a genetic diagnosis. Discussions of risk for both probands and relatives need to be tailored to their numeric literacy during shared decision-making. For patients presenting with arrhythmias or cardiomyopathy, extension of genetic testing and its implications will enable cascade screening, intervention to change the trajectory for specific genotype-phenotype profiles, and enable further development and evaluation of emerging targeted therapies.</jats:p>
  • Description: <jats:p>There is increasing evidence regarding the prevalence of genetic cardiomyopathies, for which arrhythmias may be the first presentation. Ventricular and atrial arrhythmias presenting in the absence of known myocardial disease are often labelled as idiopathic, or lone. While ventricular arrhythmias are well-recognized as presentation for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in the right ventricle, the scope of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy has broadened to include those with dominant left ventricular involvement, usually with a phenotype of dilated cardiomyopathy. In addition, careful evaluation for genetic cardiomyopathy is also warranted for patients presenting with frequent premature ventricular contractions, conduction system disease, and early onset atrial fibrillation, in which most detected genes are in the cardiomyopathy panels. Sudden death can occur early in the course of these genetic cardiomyopathies, for which risk is not adequately tracked by left ventricular ejection fraction. Only a few of the cardiomyopathy genotypes implicated in early sudden death are recognized in current indications for implantable cardioverter defibrillators which otherwise rely upon a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤0.35 in dilated cardiomyopathy. The genetic diagnoses impact other aspects of clinical management such as exercise prescription and pharmacological therapy of arrhythmias, and new therapies are coming into clinical investigation for specific genetic cardiomyopathies. The expansion of available genetic information and implications raises new challenges for genetic counseling, particularly with the family member who has no evidence of a cardiomyopathy phenotype and may face a potentially negative impact of a genetic diagnosis. Discussions of risk for both probands and relatives need to be tailored to their numeric literacy during shared decision-making. For patients presenting with arrhythmias or cardiomyopathy, extension of genetic testing and its implications will enable cascade screening, intervention to change the trajectory for specific genotype-phenotype profiles, and enable further development and evaluation of emerging targeted therapies.</jats:p>
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