• Media type: E-Article
  • Title: Blood Transfusions and Safety
  • Contributor: MATTSON, PHILIP D.
  • Source: Pediatrics ; 75 ( 1985 ) S. 987-987
  • Published: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), 1985
  • Language: English
  • DOI: 10.1542/peds.75.5.987
  • ISSN: 0031-4005; 1098-4275
  • Keywords: Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Abstract: <jats:p>To the Editor.—</jats:p> <jats:p>Transfusion practices in the neonate have become increasingly controversial with the recent reporting of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). Many parents have requested the opportunity to provide directed donations with marginal success due to lack of storage apparatus and or staff refusal. The question of increased safety has been contested, especially when the infant requires multiple donors.</jats:p> <jats:p>In some facilities, the Walking Donor Program has been resurrected. However, with heparinized syringes there is limited shelflife and inability to pack and irradiate (as done in some centers), and there are also contraints of donor availability.</jats:p>
  • Description: <jats:p>To the Editor.—</jats:p>
    <jats:p>Transfusion practices in the neonate have become increasingly controversial with the recent reporting of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). Many parents have requested the opportunity to provide directed donations with marginal success due to lack of storage apparatus and or staff refusal. The question of increased safety has been contested, especially when the infant requires multiple donors.</jats:p>
    <jats:p>In some facilities, the Walking Donor Program has been resurrected. However, with heparinized syringes there is limited shelflife and inability to pack and irradiate (as done in some centers), and there are also contraints of donor availability.</jats:p>