• Media type: E-Article
  • Title: Intraoperative ultrasound for nonpalpable breast lesions – experience and operative time
  • Contributor: Ivanov, Valentin; Dimov, Rossen; Marinov, Blagoi; Ivanov, Valentin; Tashkova, Desislava
  • imprint: Pensoft Publishers, 2023
  • Published in: Folia Medica
  • Language: Not determined
  • DOI: 10.3897/folmed.65.e76193
  • ISSN: 1314-2143; 0204-8043
  • Keywords: General Medicine
  • Origination:
  • Footnote:
  • Description: <jats:p><jats:bold>Introduction:</jats:bold> The essential tools doctors need to diagnose breast cancer tumors at the early stages and with no clinical presentation are screening mammography and ultrasonography. Nonpalpable breast lesions are a current problem nowadays and there are various types of navigation techniques that are utilized in order to achieve cancer cell-free resection margins in the first place. Intraoperative ultrasound has been proven to be a safe and effective way to excise this type of breast tumors.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Aim:</jats:bold> To study the correlation between the experience we obtained while using intraoperative ultrasound for excision of nonpalpable breast lesions, and the duration of surgery.&amp;nbsp;</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Materials and methods:</jats:bold> Twenty-five women with nonpalpable breast lesions underwent breast-conserving surgery using ultrasound navigation. Nominal and ordinal data were presented using numbers and percentages. Spearman&amp;rsquo;s rank-order correlation was used to assess the effect of experience gained on the duration of surgery.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Results:</jats:bold> The tumor distribution was 72% malignant tumors and 28% benign. A 100% identification rate in the effective surgical excisions was reported. In the process of gaining experience using the method, the duration of surgery shortened by 30%. No tumor cells on ink were found in all specimens and there was no need for secondary surgeries.</jats:p> <jats:p><jats:bold>Conclusions:</jats:bold> Our results demonstrate a relatively short learning curve, and we believe that breast surgeons should be helped and encouraged to gather adequate expertise to ensure patient safety and gain confidence.&amp;nbsp;</jats:p>
  • Access State: Open Access