• Medientyp: E-Artikel
  • Titel: High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy for Exertional Dyspnea in Patients with Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial
  • Beteiligte: Hui, David; Mahler, Donald A.; Larsson, Liliana; Wu, Jimin; Thomas, Saji; Harrison, Carol A.; Hess, Kenneth; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Thompson, Kara; Gomez, Daniel; Jeter, Melenda; Lin, Steven; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Bruera, Eduardo
  • Quelle: The Oncologist ; 26 ( 2021 ) S. e1470-e1479
  • Erschienen: Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • DOI: 10.1002/onco.13624
  • ISSN: 1083-7159; 1549-490X
  • Schlagwörter: Cancer Research ; Oncology
  • Zusammenfassung: <jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>Exertional dyspnea is common in patients with cancer and limits their function. The impact of high-flow nasal cannula on exertional dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients is unclear. In this double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial, we assessed the effect of flow rate (high vs. low) and gas (oxygen vs. air) on exertional dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients with cancer.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Patients and Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Patients with cancer with oxygen saturation &amp;gt;90% at rest and exertion completed incremental and constant work (80% maximal) cycle ergometry while breathing low-flow air at 2 L/minute. They were then randomized to receive high-flow oxygen, high-flow air, low-flow oxygen, or low-flow air while performing symptom-limited endurance cycle ergometry at 80% maximal. The primary outcome was modified 0–10 Borg dyspnea intensity scale at isotime. Secondary outcomes included dyspnea unpleasantness, exercise time, and adverse events.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Seventy-four patients were enrolled, and 44 completed the study (mean age 63; 41% female). Compared with low-flow air at baseline, dyspnea intensity was significantly lower at isotime with high-flow oxygen (mean change, −1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −2.1, −0.12) and low-flow oxygen (−1.83; 95% CI, −2.7, −0.9), but not high-flow air (−0.2; 95% CI, −0.97, 0.6) or low-flow air (−0.5; 95% CI, −1.3, 0.4). Compared with low-flow air, high-flow oxygen also resulted in significantly longer exercise time (difference + 2.5 minutes, p = .009), but not low-flow oxygen (+0.39 minutes, p = .65) or high-flow air (+0.63 minutes, p = .48). The interventions were well tolerated without significant adverse effects.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title> <jats:p>Our preliminary findings support that high-flow oxygen improved both exertional dyspnea and exercise duration in nonhypoxemic patients with cancer. (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02357134).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Implications for Practice</jats:title> <jats:p>In this four-arm, double-blind, randomized clinical trial examining the role of high-flow nasal cannula on exertional dyspnea in patients with cancer without hypoxemia, high-flow oxygen, but not high-flow air, resulted in significantly lower dyspnea scores and longer exercise time. High-flow oxygen delivered by high-flow nasal cannula devices may improve clinically relevant outcomes even in patients without hypoxemia.</jats:p> </jats:sec>
  • Beschreibung: <jats:title>Abstract</jats:title>
    <jats:sec>
    <jats:title>Background</jats:title>
    <jats:p>Exertional dyspnea is common in patients with cancer and limits their function. The impact of high-flow nasal cannula on exertional dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients is unclear. In this double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial, we assessed the effect of flow rate (high vs. low) and gas (oxygen vs. air) on exertional dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients with cancer.</jats:p>
    </jats:sec>
    <jats:sec>
    <jats:title>Patients and Methods</jats:title>
    <jats:p>Patients with cancer with oxygen saturation &amp;gt;90% at rest and exertion completed incremental and constant work (80% maximal) cycle ergometry while breathing low-flow air at 2 L/minute. They were then randomized to receive high-flow oxygen, high-flow air, low-flow oxygen, or low-flow air while performing symptom-limited endurance cycle ergometry at 80% maximal. The primary outcome was modified 0–10 Borg dyspnea intensity scale at isotime. Secondary outcomes included dyspnea unpleasantness, exercise time, and adverse events.</jats:p>
    </jats:sec>
    <jats:sec>
    <jats:title>Results</jats:title>
    <jats:p>Seventy-four patients were enrolled, and 44 completed the study (mean age 63; 41% female). Compared with low-flow air at baseline, dyspnea intensity was significantly lower at isotime with high-flow oxygen (mean change, −1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −2.1, −0.12) and low-flow oxygen (−1.83; 95% CI, −2.7, −0.9), but not high-flow air (−0.2; 95% CI, −0.97, 0.6) or low-flow air (−0.5; 95% CI, −1.3, 0.4). Compared with low-flow air, high-flow oxygen also resulted in significantly longer exercise time (difference + 2.5 minutes, p = .009), but not low-flow oxygen (+0.39 minutes, p = .65) or high-flow air (+0.63 minutes, p = .48). The interventions were well tolerated without significant adverse effects.</jats:p>
    </jats:sec>
    <jats:sec>
    <jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title>
    <jats:p>Our preliminary findings support that high-flow oxygen improved both exertional dyspnea and exercise duration in nonhypoxemic patients with cancer. (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02357134).</jats:p>
    </jats:sec>
    <jats:sec>
    <jats:title>Implications for Practice</jats:title>
    <jats:p>In this four-arm, double-blind, randomized clinical trial examining the role of high-flow nasal cannula on exertional dyspnea in patients with cancer without hypoxemia, high-flow oxygen, but not high-flow air, resulted in significantly lower dyspnea scores and longer exercise time. High-flow oxygen delivered by high-flow nasal cannula devices may improve clinically relevant outcomes even in patients without hypoxemia.</jats:p>
    </jats:sec>
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