• Medientyp: E-Artikel
  • Titel: Aesthetics, Technology, and the Capitalization of Culture: How the Talking Machine Became a Musical Instrument
  • Beteiligte: Siefert, Marsha
  • Erschienen: Cambridge University Press (CUP), 1995
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • DOI: 10.1017/s0269889700002088
  • ISSN: 0269-8897; 1474-0664
  • Schlagwörter: History and Philosophy of Science ; General Social Sciences
  • Zusammenfassung: <jats:title>The Argument</jats:title><jats:p>This article uses the history of early sound recording technology in the united States between 1878 and 1915 to show how published discourse contributed to the way the talking machine was defined and situated as a commercially viable product. Comparing the published accounts of Edison's phonograph and Berliners gramophone in popular scientific articles between 1878 and 1896 illustrates that technological advances in sound recording technology take on important cultural meanings. Critical to these meanings is the way in which the technological “fidelity” is linguistically transformed into an aesthetic quality, projected and interpreted within demonstrable values of musical culture. Beginning in 1902, the Victor Talking Machine Company, formed to market the gramophone, took advantage of these cultural meanings to claim a technological advantage over Edison's cylinder recorder. Whose voice was recorded became part of the claim to technological superiority. The Victor Company succeeded in capitalizing “Culture” by promoting their recordings of opera stars like Enrico Caruso as technologically and culturally faithful to live musical performance and as a democratically available access to a privileged lifestyle. Thus did the Victor Company use a terrier and a tenor to legitimate their talking machine as an American musical instrument</jats:p>