• Medientyp: E-Artikel
  • Titel: Detection of additional abnormalities or co-morbidities in women with suspected intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy
  • Beteiligte: Conti-Ramsden, Frances; McEwan, Michael; Hill, Rachel; Wade, Julie; Abraham, Georgina; Buckeldee, Olivia; Williamson, Catherine; Knight, Caroline L; Girling, Joanna; Chappell, Lucy C
  • Erschienen: SAGE Publications, 2020
  • Erschienen in: Obstetric Medicine
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • DOI: 10.1177/1753495x19868873
  • ISSN: 1753-495X; 1753-4968
  • Schlagwörter: Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Entstehung:
  • Anmerkungen:
  • Beschreibung: <jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p> Current guidelines recommend viral, autoimmune, coagulation and liver ultrasound testing in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy to exclude alternative diagnoses. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p> Electronic health records were searched for investigations and diagnoses in women with raised bile acid concentrations (&gt;10 µmol/L) between January 2016 and December 2017 at two UK maternity units. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p> Five hundred and thirty-one women had a raised bile acid concentration (median (IQR): 18 (13–32 µmol/L)) at a median gestation of 35.1 (IQR 31.8–37.0) weeks. Out of 531 women, 250 (47.1%) had full virology, autoimmune and ultrasound tests, and 348 (65.5%) had coagulation performed. Positive hepatitis B and C results were previously known. No new Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus or hepatitis A diagnoses were made. There were 11 positive autoimmune results, but no new diagnoses. No woman had an unexplained prolonged prothrombin time. No ultrasound liver ( n = 38) or gallbladder ( n = 85) abnormalities were of acute clinical significance. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title><jats:p> Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy investigations provided no new diagnoses that influenced clinical management during pregnancy. </jats:p></jats:sec>
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