• Medientyp: E-Artikel
  • Titel: Advances in Medical Technology and Creation of Disparities: The Case of Down Syndrome
  • Beteiligte: Khoshnood, Babak; De Vigan, Catherine; Vodovar, Véronique; Bréart, Gérard; Goffinet, François; Blondel, Béatrice
  • Erschienen: American Public Health Association, 2006
  • Erschienen in: American Journal of Public Health
  • Umfang: 2139-2144
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • DOI: 10.2105/ajph.2005.069377
  • ISSN: 0090-0036; 1541-0048
  • Schlagwörter: Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Zusammenfassung: <jats:p> Objectives. We assessed socioeconomic differences in probabilities of prena-tal diagnoses of Down syndrome and continuation of pregnancies after such diagnoses, along with the effects of these differences on disparities in live-birth prevalences of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Methods. Using population-based data derived from 1433 cases of Down syndrome and 3731 control births, we assessed age-adjusted effects of maternal occupation and geographic origin on prenatal diagnoses, as well as overall and live-birth odds, of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Results. Maternal occupation and geographic origin had significant effects on the probability of a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome and on continuation of pregnancy after such a diagnosis. Women in lower-status occupational categories had higher odds of delivering a live-born infant with Down syndrome. In comparison with women in the highest-status occupational category, the age-adjusted odds ratio for a Down syndrome live birth among women without an occupation was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7, 3.3). By contrast, there were no disparities in age-adjusted overall likelihood of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Conclusions. Socioeconomic differences in use of prenatal testing have created disparities in the live-birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Overall Down syndrome risk does not vary according to socioeconomic status. </jats:p>
  • Beschreibung: <jats:p> Objectives. We assessed socioeconomic differences in probabilities of prena-tal diagnoses of Down syndrome and continuation of pregnancies after such diagnoses, along with the effects of these differences on disparities in live-birth prevalences of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Methods. Using population-based data derived from 1433 cases of Down syndrome and 3731 control births, we assessed age-adjusted effects of maternal occupation and geographic origin on prenatal diagnoses, as well as overall and live-birth odds, of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Results. Maternal occupation and geographic origin had significant effects on the probability of a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome and on continuation of pregnancy after such a diagnosis. Women in lower-status occupational categories had higher odds of delivering a live-born infant with Down syndrome. In comparison with women in the highest-status occupational category, the age-adjusted odds ratio for a Down syndrome live birth among women without an occupation was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7, 3.3). By contrast, there were no disparities in age-adjusted overall likelihood of Down syndrome. </jats:p><jats:p> Conclusions. Socioeconomic differences in use of prenatal testing have created disparities in the live-birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Overall Down syndrome risk does not vary according to socioeconomic status. </jats:p>
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