• Medientyp: E-Artikel
  • Titel: Quercetin Administration Suppresses the Cytokine Storm in Myeloid and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells
  • Beteiligte: Verna, Giulio; Liso, Marina; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Bianco, Giusy; Di Sarno, Veronica; Santino, Angelo; Campiglia, Pietro; Chieppa, Marcello
  • Quelle: International Journal of Molecular Sciences ; 22 ( 2021 ) S. 8349
  • Erschienen: MDPI AG, 2021
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • DOI: 10.3390/ijms22158349
  • ISSN: 1422-0067
  • Schlagwörter: Inorganic Chemistry ; Organic Chemistry ; Physical and Theoretical Chemistry ; Computer Science Applications ; Spectroscopy ; Molecular Biology ; General Medicine ; Catalysis
  • Zusammenfassung: <jats:p>Dendritic cells (DCs) can be divided by lineage into myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). They both are present in mucosal tissues and regulate the immune response by secreting chemokines and cytokines. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are characterized by a leaky intestinal barrier and the consequent translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the basolateral side. This results in DCs activation, but the response of pDCs is still poorly characterized. In the present study, we compared mDCs and pDCs responses to LPS administration. We present a broad panel of DCs secreted factors, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Our recent studies demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of quercetin administration, but to date, there is no evidence about quercetin’s effects on pDCs. The results of the present study demonstrate that pDCs can respond to LPS and that quercetin exposure modulates soluble factors release through the same molecular pathway used by mDCs (Slpi, Hmox1, and AP-1).</jats:p>
  • Beschreibung: <jats:p>Dendritic cells (DCs) can be divided by lineage into myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). They both are present in mucosal tissues and regulate the immune response by secreting chemokines and cytokines. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are characterized by a leaky intestinal barrier and the consequent translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the basolateral side. This results in DCs activation, but the response of pDCs is still poorly characterized. In the present study, we compared mDCs and pDCs responses to LPS administration. We present a broad panel of DCs secreted factors, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Our recent studies demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of quercetin administration, but to date, there is no evidence about quercetin’s effects on pDCs. The results of the present study demonstrate that pDCs can respond to LPS and that quercetin exposure modulates soluble factors release through the same molecular pathway used by mDCs (Slpi, Hmox1, and AP-1).</jats:p>